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Ten Men White Sox Won’t Choose to Replace Robin Ventura

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Walker spent nine years as the White Sox hitting coach before resigning in 2011. He moved on to be the Braves hitting coach for three seasons. He has been in the their front office the last two seasons.
Walker spent nine years as the White Sox hitting coach before resigning in 2011. He moved on to be the Braves hitting coach for three seasons. He has been in the their front office the last two seasons. /

6) Greg Walker

Walker spent nine seasons as the White Sox hitting coach before leaving following the 2011 season. He then spent three seasons in Atlanta before resigning. He has worked in the Braves front office the last two seasons.

According to White Sox.Com  Walker’s hitters on the White Sox were record setters. “From the time of his promotion in 2003 through 2011, the White Sox ranked third in the majors in home runs (1,791) and seventh in slugging percentage (.430). The (White) Sox hit 200-plus home runs in seven consecutive seasons from 2000-06, which tied the Major-League record (and was later broken by the Yankees, 2000-07).”

As a player, Walker came up as a rookie with Kittle on the 1983 division winners. He hit .272 with 10 home runs and 55 RBIs platooning with former White Sox announcer Tom Paciorek that season.

At the height of his career in 1988 at the age 28, Walker suffered a seizure that could have been life-threatening. Team trainer Herm Schneider  (who is still the White Sox trainer) had to pry open Walker’s mouth to save his life. The Chicago Tribune reported on the near tragedy when it happened.

“Sox trainer Herman Schneider said he had to pry Walker`s mouth open with surgical scissors to alleviate what he termed “a life-threatening situation. He wasn`t breathing. He was scuffling to stay alive.”

"Walker, who was stricken while taking ground balls at first base, will remain at Christ Hospital for at least two days for a series of tests, including neurological examinations."

"Coach Ed Brinkman was hitting grounders to Walker when, Brinkman reported, “He went to his knees. He rolled over and it looked like he had convulsions. I came in and got the trainer.“ Until Schneider arrived, Walker, who was twitching uncontrollably, was restrained by his helpless teammates, one of whom could be heard to exclaim: “Don`t die, Greg! Don`t die!“"

Walker would never play more than 77 games in a season after the seizure. In parts of nine seasons with the White Sox, Walker hit 113 home runs, had 444 RBIs and hit .262.

Next: Pitching Coaches Make Good Managers?

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