Baseball Sabermetrics: Home Run Decimal-Abreu vs Frazier

badraus
Aug 12, 2016; Miami, FL, USA; Chicago White Sox third baseman Todd Frazier (21) connects for a double during the fifth inning against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park. Mandatory Credit: Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports
Aug 12, 2016; Miami, FL, USA; Chicago White Sox third baseman Todd Frazier (21) connects for a double during the fifth inning against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park. Mandatory Credit: Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports /
facebooktwitterreddit
Prev
8 of 8
Next
Jun 12, 2015; Chicago, IL, USA; Cincinnati Reds third baseman Todd Frazier (21) hits a home run during the third inning against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field. Mandatory Credit: Caylor Arnold-USA TODAY Sports
Jun 12, 2015; Chicago, IL, USA; Cincinnati Reds third baseman Todd Frazier (21) hits a home run during the third inning against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field. Mandatory Credit: Caylor Arnold-USA TODAY Sports /

First Half Totals

Jose Abreu 2014

Home Run Decimal

36.1966 (29 home runs hit)

Decimal Power Average

1.2482

Todd Frazier 2015

Home Run Decimal

28.0867 (25 home runs hit)

Decimal Power Average

1.1235

As I mentioned in the paragraphs above, both Abreu and Frazier victimized the same team on multiple occasions. Here are the teams they took deep the most.

Jose Abreu:

Cleveland Indians: 5 times

Detroit Tigers: 4 times

Tampa Bay Rays: 3 times

5 teams tied with 2 times

Todd Frazier:

Pittsburgh Pirates: 5 times

Atlanta Braves: 4 times

Detroit Tigers: 4 times

4 teams tied with 2 times

The interesting part is the most victimized team is a divisional opponent. Cleveland and Pittsburgh play the White Sox and Reds a lot, therefore both Abreu and Frazier get more opportunities to have success versus those teams.

In conclusion of this initial study, I will add my observations. First, I think it might make sense to add a variable where I multiply a variable less than one or more than one. It would be in the case when a home run is in the first or second inning (less than one). Assuming the game was very late, or a game winner, the variable would be multiplied into the formula. This would help evaluate a home run in a more reasonable way.

All things considered, this is a solid case study of the home run decimal. Expect more studies with evaluations of hitters who do not have power, but this is a good start. While there will be more HRD studies to come, keep in mind this formula may change before I perform it. Stick around, more to come.

facebooktwitterreddit