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White Sox: On-track rebuild is a beautiful sign of things to come

dhersman
CHICAGO, IL - MAY 19: Jose Abreu #79 of the Chicago White Sox is congratulated by Matt Davidson #24 after hitting a home run against the Texas Rangers during the seventh inning at Guaranteed Rate Field on May 19, 2018 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jon Durr/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - MAY 19: Jose Abreu #79 of the Chicago White Sox is congratulated by Matt Davidson #24 after hitting a home run against the Texas Rangers during the seventh inning at Guaranteed Rate Field on May 19, 2018 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jon Durr/Getty Images) /
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CHICAGO, IL – JUNE 17: Starting pitcher James Shields #33 of the Chicago White Sox delivers the ball against the Detroit Tigers at Guaranteed Rate Field on June 17, 2018 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images) /

The White Sox 2018 season is painful, but if you look just beyond the ugly, it is all breathtakingly beautiful.

White Sox fans, this is what so many of us asked for!

The front office tore it down, leaving nothing more than a barely recognizable foundation of a roster. So far, the results of the White Sox rebuild have been exactly what you’d expect from a group of journeymen, bounce-back candidates, and stopgaps: pretty horrendous. At 24-47, things are messy. However, I ask you to peek through the mess and see the rebuild’s inner beauty.

Extra! Extra! Contending teams – take notice!

No, not because my preseason prediction of a surprise 82-80 season is a reality. I am reaching out to contenders because the White Sox have what you need! Trades that might seem insignificant or unimportant sometimes end up making a difference in a rebuilding effort.

White Sox fans may not be overly excited to see these guys on the field, and I can’t necessarily blame them. The good news is that some of them can help brighten up the edges of the rebuild. Here are some players who have performed well enough to potentially provide some solid trade value.

Left-handers

Almost the entire White Sox bullpen is made up of trade candidates. Xavier Cedeno and Luis Avilan look impressive, and their FIPs both estimate they have thrown the ball better than their low ERAs. Hector Santiago continues to eat up relatively effective, albeit somewhat underwhelming innings as both a starter and reliever. Left-handed arms are always at a premium down the stretch. Tough left-handed power guy in the middle of your rival’s lineup? Make an offer for one of these guys, here!

Right-handers

Are righties more your area of need? Chris Volstad has a 3.96 ERA, functioning mostly as a multi-inning reliever. He could probably start in a pinch to provide some extra rest for one of your prized starters, as well. Need a late-inning, fireballing wild card (emphasis on wild)? Bruce Rondon brings the heat and high strikeout capability, as long as you can deal with some walks.

If reliability in the clutch is your jam, what about Joakim Soria? He’s 10 of 12 in save opportunities, can touch the low 90s with his fastball, and high 60s with his curveball or ephus pitch or whatever that floater actually is. Either way, he’s been effective in holding the opposition in check when he’s had the chance to close the door. Is he the setup man or backup closer you need?

Earlier in the year, I wrote that James Shields could be a useful member of the team or a potential trade candidate if he keeps his ERA under four and a half. Right now, he sits at 4.63 with a FIP of 4.51, and he wants to win, which is not likely to happen often while the White Sox rebuild. I bet the front office would be willing to eat a decent chunk of his contract to get even a fringe prospect in return. Contenders, if you’ve got a deep farm system, give Rick Hahn a call!

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