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White Sox: Is Tim Anderson’s jersey number destined for retirement?

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TORONTO, ON - MAY 10: Tim Anderson #7 of the Chicago White Sox hits a solo home run in the fifth inning during MLB game action against the Toronto Blue Jays at Rogers Centre on May 10, 2019 in Toronto, Canada. (Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON - MAY 10: Tim Anderson #7 of the Chicago White Sox hits a solo home run in the fifth inning during MLB game action against the Toronto Blue Jays at Rogers Centre on May 10, 2019 in Toronto, Canada. (Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images) /
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I know it’s very early, but with Tim Anderson’s recent success, I think it’s appropriate to start wondering if his jersey could be retired by the White Sox one day?

Sure, it’s only his fourth year in the league, but a potential long career with the White Sox would present a great chance for Anderson to be enshrined as the fifth single digit number to be retired by the Sox.

He was raised in the White Sox system and he looks prepared to put the weight of the southside on his shoulders. Will he be honored for it at the end of the day?

The Sox have not necessarily shown a reluctance to retire numbers. They have 12 total retired, and they have typically honored those who were the most loyal to wear the Sox uniform.

Mark Buehrle is probably not a Hall of Famer (though I think he deserves to be) but that didn’t stop the Sox from retiring his 56 back in 2017. Minnie Minoso played in parts of 12 different seasons for the Sox, and they expressed their gratitude by enshrining his number nine.

Paul Konerko stayed on the southside his whole career despite being a legitimate superstar and his number was retired. It’s not always about the numbers.

While it may not always be about the numbers, it’s important to note that nine of the 12 Sox retired numbers were worn by Hall of Famers. Numbers do help.

Speaking of numbers, lets compare Tim’s to a shortstop whose number is forever retired. Luis Aparicio‘s number 11 was one of the earlier numbers to be retired by the Sox.

Anderson and Aparicio are similar in the fact that they are both speedy shortstops that manned the position for the Sox from a young age. Aparicio, however, was second in MVP voting in his fourth year in the league in 1959. Anderson, who is currently in his fourth year, probably won’t match that in voting.

However, their earlier numbers are very similar. In fact, they had the exact same batting average of .257 in their second years in the league, they both led their teams in stolen bases throughout their first couple of years in the league, they both struggled defensively in their first few seasons, and both started their careers with the Sox. Their similarities are almost uncanny 60 years later.

Luis Aparicio had played 1511 games with the White Sox by the time he hung up the cleats. Although he made stints with other teams around the league, his overall loyalty to the team throughout his career earned him an enshrinement in the Sox Hall of Fame.

Again, I realize it is way too early to really predict such an honor, but at this point, Anderson’s ability looks like it’s enough to get him the honor some day.

The question is, will his loyalty to the Sox match that of Aparicio’s and earn him a spot in White Sox immortality? Of course, that works both ways. The Sox have to stay loyal to him as well.

After the White Sox recent game against the Royals, Anderson made it seem like he’s here to stay.

Next. White Sox Should Sign Dallas Keuchel. dark

Any time you have a burning passion against the Kansas City Royals, you’re meant to be playing on the south side.

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