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White Sox: HOF Jim Thome reminds fans what baseball is all about

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CHICAGO - APRIL 7: Jim Thome #25 and Bobby Jenks #45 of the Chicago White Sox celebrate a win over the Kansas City Royals after the Opening Day game on April 7, 2009 at U.S. Cellular Field in Chicago, Illinois. The White Sox defeated the Royals 4-2. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
CHICAGO - APRIL 7: Jim Thome #25 and Bobby Jenks #45 of the Chicago White Sox celebrate a win over the Kansas City Royals after the Opening Day game on April 7, 2009 at U.S. Cellular Field in Chicago, Illinois. The White Sox defeated the Royals 4-2. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images) /
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Even though Hall of Fame inductee Jim Thome only played a few seasons with the White Sox, he had some of his most memorable years in there.

At the Hall of Fame events, the former White Sox DH and first baseman shared his experience with his teammates and his family during his short tenure in Chicago.

His experience was captured in a video on NBC Sports.

Thome spoke fondly about his time in Chicago, especially after he experienced his mother’s death right around the time of his trade. With baseball, he was able to experience both joy and happiness, as well as the sadness surrounding the death of his mother. He talked about what baseball is really all about in his eyes – a brotherhood.

COOPERSTOWN, NY – JULY 29: Jim Thome is presented his plaque from Hall of Fame President Jeff Idelson at Clark Sports Center during the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony on July 29, 2018 in Cooperstown, New York. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
COOPERSTOWN, NY – JULY 29: Jim Thome is presented his plaque from Hall of Fame President Jeff Idelson at Clark Sports Center during the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony on July 29, 2018 in Cooperstown, New York. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images) /

He said it best in his Hall of Fame speech – when he said about baseball:

"“This is the ultimate fraternity.”"

And, he didn’t mean the kind of fraternity that pulls pranks and causes problems on campus. He meant a brotherhood. Thome really felt the brotherhood during his time with the White Sox, especially since he grew up in Peoria.

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During his speech, he mentioned how much he appreciated his time in Chicago, especially with what was happening in his personal life. During tough times, friendships, colleagues, bosses, and the like can make a major difference. The help he received from the White Sox was something special for Thome.

Most of Thome’s speech was about the brotherhood of the game, but he made sure to mention the fans. When he spoke about Chicago, he fondly remembered “the immense pride” on the South Side.

He appreciated it so much that he is still working with the White Sox, but this time in the front office. It is clear that playing on the South Side was special for Thome. Now, he works with the men who treated him so well during his time as a player. According to an article on MLB.com by Scott Merken, Thome gets to share his experiences with the men who wear the pale hose.

Next. Rick Hahn asks for patience during rebuild. dark

Thome wore six different uniforms in his 22 years in the MLB. The fact that he now works as a special assistant to Rick Hahn says something about his relationship with the White Sox as a player and as a man.

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