White Sox: Bobby Jenks Given $5.1 Million in Injury Settlement

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CHICAGO, IL - JULY 18: Former player Bobby Jenks of the Chicago White Sox is introduced to the crowd during a ceremony honoring the 10th anniversary of the 2005 World Series Champion Chicago White Sox team before a game against the Kansas City Royals at U.S. Cellular Field on July 18, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - JULY 18: Former player Bobby Jenks of the Chicago White Sox is introduced to the crowd during a ceremony honoring the 10th anniversary of the 2005 World Series Champion Chicago White Sox team before a game against the Kansas City Royals at U.S. Cellular Field on July 18, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images) /
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Former White Sox closer wins a settlement that unfortunately was due to a botched surgery that ultimately ended his MLB career.

It wasn’t long ago that White Sox fans were used to seeing Bobby Jenks win on the mound. The two-time All-Star, who finished his career with 173 saves (all in Chicago), became a fan favorite upon his debut and earned the save to give the White Sox their only World Series win of the last 100 years.

On Wednesday, Jenks walked out a winner once again…this time in court.

As reported Wednesday night by several journalists – including Michael Walton of NBC Sports Chicago – Jenks received $5.1 million in an injury settlement with Massachusetts General Hospital.

Following six seasons in Chicago, Jenks signed a two-year deal with Boston in 2011. However, he only appeared in 19 games, never recorded a save, and was on the disabled list multiple times. An otherwise routine surgery to remove bone spurs from his back – one that Jenks had previously undergone – was scheduled for that December. The results were disastrous.

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“When Bobby Jenks went under the knife on Dec. 12 in Boston, the reliever was scheduled to have two of four bone spurs removed. Unbeknownst to Jenks, the surgeon botched the procedure by starting –– and then not finishing –– a third bone spur” noted Didier Morais in a 2015 article.

“As the Red Sox hurler began his recovery phase, he noticed spinal fluid leaking from the surgical incision. Then, after a week, he experienced throbbing headaches…It called for an emergency surgery… Although Jenks’ back was still sensitive from the previous procedure, he was forced to go under the knife immediately or the ramifications could’ve been fatal.”

Jenks never played another major league game.

He filed to sue Dr. Kirkham Wood and Massachusetts General Hospital, with a decision being rendered on Monday.

According to Walton’s article, “Jenks has said he plans to use the $5.1 million from the settlement to teach the general public about the great dangers connected to concurrent surgery.”

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As popular as he once was, Jenks’ career can be viewed as one that died too soon. Yet Jenks – who is married with a son – escaped with something more important…his life.

For his contributions to the White Sox, it’s fair to say that Jenks – both as a player and a person – won’t soon be forgotten.

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